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PornHub says its visitors like engaging VR content too

Pornhub says its users are consuming more VR content. / Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/en/woman-vr-virtual-reality-technology-1418848/

As virtual reality (VR) gains steam in markets like real estate, booze, cars, movies and sports, it is perhaps not surprising it is also infiltrating adult entertainment. And it is making quite a splash there, it seems.

According to research from video site PornHub, VR has become one of its fastest growing categories. Since launching with 30 VR videos in the spring of 2016, PornHub said its collection has grown to include more than 2,600 videos that are viewed 500,000 times a day.

Compared to other categories, PornHub said VR visitors typically watch multiple videos per visit, but their actual time on site remains about the same at just under 10 minutes.

“Perhaps the unique visual experience makes them want to test out more new content,” the platform surmised.

Men are 160% more likely to watch VR content than women, and the 25-to-34-year-old age group is 47% more likely to watch VR videos.

In addition, PornHub noted when looking for VR videos, visitors are most likely to search for “VR”, followed by “360 VR” and “360 degree”.

Over the last 12 months, VR viewership has increased across the US, but PornHub said the largest growth in popularity has occurred in Eastern states, including New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island and New Jersey. While California still accounts for the most VR video views each day, the growth rate in popularity has been much slower, the platform added.

Nevertheless, PornHub said VR remains most popular in countries like Thailand, Hong Kong, the Philippines and Taiwan. At the same time, over the last 12 months, the highest rate of growth in VR video consumption has been in Ireland and the UK, by nearly 250%, PornHub added.

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Lisa Lacy

Lisa Lacy is a senior reporter for The Drum, covering digital and search marketing. Based in New York, she writes about how brands use technology to connect with consumers, particularly as innovations like voice search, digital assistants and the Internet of Things change consumers’ lives forever – not to mention the data these platforms increasingly collect and the security and privacy issues therein. She is a graduate of Columbia's School of Journalism. Her bucket list includes riding in the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

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