Bill Nighy asks ‘Why would anyone shop at TK Maxx?’ in retailer’s zany TVC

TK Maxx has enlisted the dulcet tones of actor Billy Nighy for its latest ad, which features an assortment of eclectic dinner party guests in weird and wonderful scenarios.

Created by Wieden+Kennedy, the ad forms part of the designer discount brand’s ‘Ridiculous possibilities’ campaign.

It opens in cinematic style with a dinner party before each of the guests explain why they shop at TK Maxx in a variety of colourful and wacky situations. These include playing a game of squash with a frying pan to finding a pair of shoes in the middle of lake.

The 60-second spot, which airs from today (12 May), admits that while the store might not offer perks such as “complimentary lattes”, it’s “the small prices you pay, to pay the small prices you pay for the big labels in TK Maxx”.

Deborah Dolce, group brand and marketing director at TK Maxx, said: “TK Maxx is a different sort of retailer and in this campaign we bring to life the central concept of our model – that ‘ridiculous possibilities’ are afforded to our shoppers precisely because of the way we do business.

“We are able to bring big labels at amazing value to our customers because of our unique approach; the central line ‘these are the small prices you pay, to pay the small prices you pay at TK Maxx’ is a brilliant expression of everything that we are proud of. ‘Why would anyone shop at TK Maxx?’ is a conversation that happens at pubs and dinner tables around the country and we are delighted to bring it to life in our now well established world of Ridiculous Possibilities, wonderful and quirky.”

The through-the-line campaign will run across print, outdoor, digital, social, mobile and PR.

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Katie Deighton

Katie Deighton is The Drum’s senior reporter - creative and video based in London. She produces, films, presents and edits the title’s editorial video output, including series such as On The Scene, Ad Breakers and Why I Left Advertising, and manages its coverage of the creative sector. She also reports on the intersection between politics and marketing, as well as the third sector and fashion.

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