Bose accused of spying on the listening habits of wireless headphone users

Bose accused of spying on the listening habits of wireless headphone users

Audio equipment specialist Bose has found itself dragged behind the dock amidst accusations that it has been spying on the listening habits of wireless headphone users by tracking music, podcasts and other audio channeled through its speakers.

A lawsuit filed by Kyle Zak at a federal court in Chicago alleges that Bose used its Bose Connect app to gather the data showing ‘wholesale disregard’ for the privacy rights of music lovers by selling on the information it had obtained without securing consent.

Zak contends that he was unaware of Bose’s practices prior to downloading the free app to his smartphone, only subsequently being made aware that Bose passed on ‘all available media information’ to third parties at a later date.

This is because a privacy agreement signed by customers when they apply to use Bose’s service makes no mention of data collection.

Zak’s lawyer Christopher Dore said: “People should be uncomfortable with it. People put headphones on their head because they think it's private, but they can be giving out information they don't want to share.”

In light of these grievances Zak is seeking millions of dollars in damages for purchasers of Bose products including QuietControl 30, SoundLink Around-Ear Wireless Headphones II and SoundSport Pulse Wireless.

Bose recently joined Danone in partnering with Spotify to push its wireless headphones through branded moments.

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John Glenday

John Glenday is responsible for compiling The Drum's daily morning bulletin and ensuring that overnight breaking news is covered while you're still brushing your teeth. Can also make a mean cup of tea.

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