Women’s Equality Party launches emotive poster campaign spotlighting uncomfortable gender truths

Now were briefed to highlight the gender pay gap and domestic violence

The Women’s Equality Party has begun its campaign for the Liverpool mayoral election with the unveiling of hard-hitting, out-of-home creative that explores domestic violence against women and the gender pay gap.

The two issues are the main priorities of the WEP’s mayoral candidate , Tabitha Morton, who is standing against representatives from the Conservatives, Labour, Lib Dems, Greens and UKIP in the 4 May ‘metro mayor' elections.

The creative has been designed by lead agency Now to highlight the uncomfortable truths around gender inequality in a visceral way. One poster features an empty purse, which on first glance appears to look like a vagina, accompanied by the strapline ‘Women are being shortchanged by £23.7 billion’: the amount of money lost in the northwest each year because of the gender pay gap.

Another portrays a bad case of bodily bruising, which in fact reads ‘May 4th’ – ‘The day Liverpool starts to heal’. The WEP hopes this message will be particularly salient in a city where a domestic violence case is reported every 15 minutes.

Posterscope has donated regional digital outdoor space to the campaign.

Catherine Riley, head of comms at WEP, said: “We're excited to be changing the conversation in the Liverpool Metro Mayoral election. For too long, politics in the city has been dominated by white men, who have done little or nothing to prioritise policies that will help women and families in the region. We're in the race to change all that."

Melissa Robertson, chief executive of Now, added: “We wanted to find ways of bringing the brutal facts about inequality in Liverpool to life in a visually arresting way. It's all about making people stand up and take notice, because the more people understand the problem, the more they can be part of the solution."

Katie Deighton

Katie Deighton is The Drum’s senior reporter - creative and video based in London. She produces, films, presents and edits the title’s editorial video output, including series such as On The Scene, Ad Breakers and Why I Left Advertising, and manages its coverage of the creative sector. She also reports on the intersection between politics and marketing, as well as the third sector and fashion.

All by Katie