We reveal the young women trailblazing through the digital industry in The Drum's 50 under 30

We reveal the young women trailblazing through the digital industry in The Drum's 50 under 30

Each day this week, The Drum will be publishing a list of 10 of the 50 high achieving women making their mark in digital before the age of 30.

The Drum’s 50 under 30 does just that. After calling on our readers to share their nominations of women who had broken the mould and gone above and beyond before reaching the age of 30, the final 50 were curated with the help of an industry panel.

The list serves to celebrate the level of female digital talent carving out a new way for the industry. Over the next five days, we catch up with the 50, listed alphabetically by surname, to discuss career highlights, a typical day, and what advice they’d give younger women starting out on a similar path.

Here is the fourth installment of the 10 individuals chosen for this year, you can catch the first here.

Courtney Spritzer, co-chief executive and co-founder, Socialfly

What is your biggest career achievement to date?

I co-founded Socialfly in the summer of 2011 on the side of my full-time job at American Express. We quit our jobs in May of 2012 and have had many amazing accomplishments since as a result of our hard work.

Who or what motivates you?

Surrounding myself with positive and determined people has always motivated me. My father passed away of cancer when I was 10 years old. This taught me that life is short and you should make the most of each and every day.

Victoria Stoyanova, founder, Malleable

What is your biggest career achievement to date?

Developing global communities for Techstars, Second Home and Creative Mornings and starting my own company, Malleable.

What one piece of advice would you offer someone entering marketing today?

Find a mentor – it makes everything easier. Start by contacting the people who motivate you, inspire you or intrigue you. Ask them the questions you have for them. You would be surprised how much people want to help.

Suky Stroud, senior writer, Zone

What is your biggest career achievement to date?

Starting a Twitter beef with Drake on behalf of a supermarket back in 2015. On a serious note though, it’s an achievement just having a career that lets me be creative and have opinions, and also pays, let alone one that other people think I’m good at.

What technology do you most need day-to-day?

This is probably cheating, but the internet. It is both my input and output. It’s where I go to find inspiration, and where that inspiration ends up. I could totally live without it, but I’d rather not.

Emilie Tabor, co-founder and strategic director, IMA

What one piece of advice would you offer someone entering marketing today?

Try to surround yourself with people who inspire you, always challenge yourself so you don’t stand still, and make sure you do things that energise you.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?

As long as I wake up every day with as much energy and passion for what I am doing as I do today, then it’s all good to me.

Eniko Tarkany-Szucs, senior partner manager, EMEA, Sprinklr

What is your biggest career achievement to date?

I spent a month in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on-site with a client who was launching a new telco brand. It’s not very common for a woman to travel alone to Saudi Arabia and I didn’t know what to expect. I learned a lot about the culture of Saudis and about launching a new brand from top marketers.

Do you believe diversity in the industry is changing for the better?

I think there is a push for change and there are a lot of great organisations out there. Generally, I think there needs to be more women in leadership positions and/or male dominated fields who are prepared to mentor and serve as role models to other women.

Emily Waddell, marketing and PR executive, E3

What brand means the most to you?

I am hugely interested in how UFC is using its unique model to become a platform, rather than just a sport. I’ll be very interested to see how it is going to engage both the casual and hardcore mixed martial arts community now that it has been acquired.

Do you believe diversity in the industry is changing for the better?

I feel like it is, but more needs to be done. Agencies need to openly commit to diversity without thinking of it as a trendy fad. And there’s still a huge lack of POC, people with disabilities and LGBTQI people in the industry.

Jenny Wall, client leadership account director, iProspect

What one piece of advice would you offer someone entering marketing today?

Do your homework. There are so many routes you can take but not all marketing disciplines may be right for you. Get this right up front and land your dream job.

What brand means the most to you?

I would say John Lewis. I have always been extremely fond of the brand from a young age and working with it on a professional level has only intensified this. Its stance on quality, service and price is unique to the retail market and instills trust across a wide consumer set.

Kathryn Webb, creative developer, AKQA

What is your biggest career achievement to date?

A major highlight of my career to date has been working on the ‘Don’t Look Away’ project, in partnership with Sankofa and Usher. The experience directly highlights issues of racial injustice, so I was inspired from the start because we knew it was going to deliver a powerful and poignant message that really mattered to people.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?

Heading up a company offering awesome digital experiences and products, with a core focus on the creative application of artificial intelligence. The work can include everything from visuals to voice, psychology to art, all of which can be created, curated or enhanced using AI algorithms and services.

Caroline West, senior account manager, Fetch

Do you believe diversity in the industry is changing for the better?

There has been an improvement, mainly due to the great efforts of people and groups who are continually trying to raise awareness of inequality.

Describe yourself in three words.

Compassionate, trustworthy, versatile.

To keep up with the 50 under 30 women in digital you can go here or read more in the magazine.

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Jenny Cleeton

Jenny Cleeton is The Drum's video and social media content creator working across the The Drum's digital platforms based in London. She produces, films, presents and edits the title's social video output while also reporting on the creative marketing sector.

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