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An inside look at HBO's and Netflix's opposing series release strategy

A popular notion in the TV industry right now is that if a network produces quality content viewers will find it. It doesn’t need to air on Thursday nights at 8pm nor does it need to air in a particular season of the year.

HBO, however, has bucked this trend by continuing to release its most popular shows at the end of winter into early spring. This gives the network more time to promote the series, enable viewers to catch up to the most current season, and build anticipation. Netflix, though, continues to release series old and new steadily throughout the year.

This and other differences between Netflix and HBO’s HBO Go platform has been analyzed by Jumpshot, a marketing analytics company that “boasts a panel of 107 million consumers and analyzes more than 5 billion clicks daily.”

Below, some additional findings from Jumpshot, followed by an infographic:

- 25X more people watch Netflix Originals in the first three days after a show airs than in the following 2 months. HBO GO viewership peaks on the days new episodes air, accounting for 1.6X more traffic than the weekly average.

- HBO GO saw a record-breaking high in streaming views between April 12 and June 14, then saw a 50 per cent drop by September that continued for the rest of the year. This suggests that viewership is reliant on the show being live to feed watercooler talk.

Audience demographic highlights according to age, gender and location for Game of Thrones, Silicon Valley, Veep, Orange is the New Black, Narcos, and Master of None.

- Orange is the New Black viewership declined by 87 per cent between the June and July.

- Narcos is streamed 23 per cent more in Nevada than the rest of the US.

- Game of Thrones has double the viewers on Sunday nights compared to the week's average.

Adam Flomenbaum

Adam Flomenbaum is a global leading expert on social television, over the top platforms, TV Everywhere, and content marketing. Flomenbaum has written for Dime Magazine and Brooklyn’s Finest (ESPN TrueHoop). In January 2014, he began contributing to LostRemote, a leading social TV blog, and was named editor in October 2014.

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