Powerful Amnesty International campaign uses hyper-realistic body artworks to promote sexual and reproductive rights

Amnesty International is hoping to end discriminatory use of criminal law to regulate sexuality and reproduction in a campaign, My Body My Rules, created by Taylor Herring.

The two year campaign will see the agency look to empower people to claim and exercise their sexual and reproductive rights free from discrimination, coercion and violence, and begins with a series of hyper-realistic body artworks created with Tokyo based artist Hikaru Cho.

Pete Mountstevens, managing partner at Taylor Herring is leading the campaign. He said: “We are thrilled to be working with Amnesty, an organisation we greatly admire. Our creative is designed to engage a younger audience in a way that will stimulate discussion around the key campaign issues. Hikaru was perfect for the campaign and was able to address serious issues in a way that both informs and entertains.”The art sees images – such as the faces of two men kissing, and a cracked face - painted directly onto the bodies of participating models, using only acrylic paint.A time lapse video of the art can also be seen below.

Joey Hasson from Amnesty International said of the work: “Taylor Herring helped us give visual expression to a complex and controversial set of campaign issues to communicate to a global audience.”As well as devising the creative, Taylor Herring will handle UK media relations around the launch.

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