21 May 2013 - 11:53am | posted by | 4 comments

High Court orders Marks & Spencer to pay Interflora damages in Google AdWords row

High Court orders Marks & Spencer to pay Interflora damages in Google AdWords rowHigh Court orders Marks & Spencer to pay Interflora damages in Google

The High Court of England and Wales has today announced its judgement in the case of Interflora, Inc. and Interflora British Unit versus Marks and Spencer plc, which has been ongoing since 2008.

Justice Arnold ruled in favour of Interflora, finding that Marks and Spencer's use of the ‘Interflora’ trade mark as a Google AdWord to advertise its M&S Flowers & Gifts website was trademark infringement.

Justice Arnold said: "The M&S advertisements which are the subject of Interflora’s claim did not enable reasonably well-informed and reasonably attentive internet users to ascertain whether the service referred to in the advertisements originated from [M&S or Interflora] ... On the contrary, as at 6 May 2008, a significant proportion of the consumers who searched for “interflora” and the other signs, and then clicked on M&S’s advertisements displayed in response to those searches, were led to believe, incorrectly, that M&S’s flower delivery service was part of the Interflora network."

The judgment means that Marks and Spencer cannot bid on the trademarked term ‘Interflora’ in the Google AdWords programme.

Rhys Hughes, president of Interflora British Unit, said: "This ruling helps ensure that when consumers search on the internet for "Interflora", they can be confident in knowing that the flowers bought online come from a member of the Interflora network. Keyword advertising is a very powerful tool and so it is vital for consumer protection that internet search results take consumers directly to the brands they are looking for. The Interflora brand stands for quality and service, a reputation we have been building, with our network of independent florists, since 1923.”

The case will return to court later in the year to determine how much Marks and Spencer must pay Interflora in terms of damages.

Comments

21 May 2013 - 14:38
markp12532's picture

So how come if I type interflora in Google the 3rd ad that appears is for M&S?

0
2
21 May 2013 - 16:53
neilc12614's picture

Somebody should send M&S some flowers with a little 'With sympathy' card. The card wld not necessarily relate to M&S flowers' business, of course.

0
0
3 Jun 2013 - 16:09
biggr70852's picture

Actually Mark has a point, despite this comment seeming stupid. The article above states: The judgment means that Marks and Spencer cannot bid on the trademarked term ‘Interflora' in the Google AdWords programme. Clearly this is a load of rusty toilet. It's one thing for a judge to rule that based on the trademark infringement they have to pay damages but completely another for any judge in the world to ever rule that one brand may not actively bid on another when others do so still. I think that makes sense. Google rules the world, Justice Arnold just thinks he's pulling the strings here.

Interflora are bidding up 3 URLs to push m&s down to P4.

0
0
1 Dec 2013 - 20:52
grahamlang

Google needs to address this ie brand owners should be offered "first right" free as part of an Adwords packaged investment. Brand word thieves should get more creative with their product description. In all cases years and $m of brand investment should be protected. Rant over:-)

1
0

Please sign in or register to comment on this article.

Latest Projects from the Profile Hub

THE CO-OPERATIVE BANK BRAND ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN

30/10/2014
Creating a brand campaign for a high street bank is always...

Rock of Ages on Tour

30/10/2014
CONTRACT START/END DATE September/October 2014 DESCRIPTION...

Reed Learning Personalisation with Sitecore

30/10/2014
Reed Learning, a leading provider of training courses and ...

First-time cruisers? It soon becomes a long-term love-in…

29/10/2014
Since July 2013, Cruise Nation and Rooster PR have been on...

Brand Campaign for 123RF

28/10/2014
The Challenge Help 123RF stand out against big-name image...