15 May 2012 - 6:24pm | posted by | 20 comments

Russell Buckley declares that QR Codes are dead and predicts the dawn of Google contact lenses

Russell Buckley declares that QR Codes are dead and predicts the dawn of Google contact lensesRussell Buckley declares that QR Codes are dead and predicts the dawn

Russell Buckley, who many see as the 'godfather of mobile' gave a rapid fire round up of key technologies he believes will disappear as mobile technology continues its exponential growth.

Buckley, who is a former global chairman of the Mobile Marketing Association, and chief marketing officer at Eagle Eye Solutions, gave a list to an Admonsters OPS conference that included:

1) The camera: there are now more cameras in mobile devices than were ever made as standalone products. The camera will go the same way as camera film.

2) The games console: this fact will prove hugely disruptive to the big games company, but there is no doubt mobile is poised to take this market.

3) The iPod: Apple is not immune from the monster it helped create. Even Steve Jobs admitted his beloved iPod's days are numbered.

4) Landline telephone: As networks improve, the Wichita Lineman man will be soon heading for the dole queue.

5) The calculator: this product has not changed in 15 years, as manufacturers acknowledge that mobile will take this market.

6) Sat Nav: looks like Tom Tom's famous product will soon be lost in the wilderness, as map apps improve.

7) The Hotel Wake-Up Call: Hotels still quaintly ask if guest require a wake-up call. Why, when everybody has an alarm clock in their pocket?

8) Locks: we're not there yet, but mobiles will soon open doors - literary and metaphorically.

9) Coupons: why cut out newspapers coupons, when you can collect them and redeem them on digital device?

10) Money - and not because of the economic tsunami coming this way from Greece. Mobile payment is on its way, and industry insiders will be watching the development of the iPhone 5 with interest. You can assume Apple will be major players on the mobile payment front.

11) PCs: mobile will do to the PC, what PCs did to the mainframe. Desktops will give way to desk space.

12) QR codes. This is an intermediate technology, which will be rendered redundant by face recognition type technology. The discipline doesn't help itself - what is the point of putting them on trains?

But what about the distant future? How will the market look in 2036, for example? Buckley predicts mobiles will be the size of a red blood cell, and we will all be walking around wearing Google contact lenses, providing us with data, and augmented reality on the go. Some, rather quaintly, might use them to see the real world.

Comments

16 May 2012 - 10:16
qrcra16528's picture

What a load of drivel! 'godfather of mobile' , what exactly did he do to deserve that title from so many people? Nice predictions care to put a timeframe of these? without a timeframe what is the point of such predictions. Its like me saying we will be taken over by an alien race, I’ll never be wrong if I don’t provide a timeframe.

#Assuming 10 -20 Years

1. Digital Cameras, there will always be a need for standalone digital camera at the higher end, a smartphone will never have the optics of a prosumer camera, however it is likely that sub £200 cameras sales will fall away.

2. maybe pocket consoles such as the DS and PSP like devices, but never home consoles.

4. there will always be a need for wires as it is the most reliable mode of data transfer, telephone lines will continue to carry much of the UK's data. Government short sightedness to open up more wireless spectrum for high speed, high availability reaching remote locations has guaranteed that.

5. The calculator on sale today are the same when I was in school, nothing has changed because they just work. Smartphones in exams? Desktop calculators allow a frictionless experience to do your calculations for heavy users in finance departments they will never go looking for their phone, unlock the phone, Oh i’ve got 3 emails and a voicemail! before getting around to launching the “app”

9. is a pretty lame prediction, will newspapers still exist? Has groupon not proven that customer loyalty and returning customers are key to success not a quick influx of penny savers?

10. Mobile payment will be thrown down our necks for the next 5 -10 years and we should all be afraid of what it could lead to. A Cashless society is terrible idea, with all transactions able to be traced and all transactions been charged 1 to 5% by merchants, don’t be fooled by the convenience factor, they just want more money.

11. Like Steve said “PCs are going to be like trucks,” he said, pointing out that most people drive cars, while trucks are only sold for very particular, specialized needs. PC’s are needed to build the consumer tech.

12. QR codes were they even ever alive?

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16 May 2012 - 15:05
adamf97745's picture

@qrcra16528 Couldn't agree more with you, I was incensed at reading this article and was just about to write a replay to all points, but you've saved me the trouble, Thanks

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16 May 2012 - 10:30
JetElson

Only IF phones have a better battery life than the day i seem to get out of my HTC evo...

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16 May 2012 - 11:18
Ogilvy's picture

Call of Duty on a mobile? Don't be ridiculous. That is one market mobile will not be taking.

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16 May 2012 - 11:18
yeahinabituk

Can't agree more with the post above on pretty much every point, funny thing is I bet he was championing QR codes 18 months ago. I'm guessing - self proclaimed 'king of mobile'...?!

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16 May 2012 - 11:26
spook's picture

I think we have already been taken over by an alien race. It's called mobile.

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16 May 2012 - 17:16
stephen_newton's picture

@qrcra16528 is spot on. The calculator point is useful I had a really slim, solar powered Casio scientific calculator in 1984 that was great for school. Calculators haven't moved on since not because they're redundant, but because they've matured; there's nowhere else for them to go.

PCs won't go either, they will mature. Nobody will want to write a long report, academic dissertation or a novel on a mobile.

People will pick out the right tool for the job.

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16 May 2012 - 15:24
Patrick C. Kavanagh's picture

@stephen_newton Though my partner has written a good percentage of her PhD on an iPad... I NEVER thought this would happen. Just a thought.

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16 May 2012 - 15:43
stephen_newton's picture

@Patrick C. Kavanagh okay, I guess there's always one

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16 May 2012 - 15:47
Patrick C. Kavanagh's picture

@stephen_newton In a test group of one, yes. Maybe we should band together and perform a larger sample size. We can then be coined the 'Gods of Writing Things on a Mobile Device'. We'll be famous I tell you, Famous!

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16 May 2012 - 12:16
alwayzsidewayz's picture

Arthur C Clarke would be proud of that post!

Long time in the future till I change my shed and garage locks for a mobile enabled device!!!

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16 May 2012 - 15:49
Patrick C. Kavanagh's picture

They could start your car as well! Plug and drive... Now I'm on to something. When you plug your phone in your seats and heating adjust to your liking... Plug and operate your home... your partners phone can also do the same... except her preferences then run your home... etc. etc... It's here and it's now!

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16 May 2012 - 16:31
steve_moncrieff's picture

that said I've a friend who can control through his mobile cctv cameras at his home, farm and factory, control the lights, security and heating of his house, all from an iPhone. In terms of cameras yes there will always be specialist high end but for the average person on the street mobile will be just fine, and what about wireless connectivity for gaming.

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16 May 2012 - 16:38
truef12166's picture

My phone currently struggles to keep battery juice for one day, without being the modern day Swiss army knife. My solar-powered calculator doesn't have this problem.

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16 May 2012 - 16:46
alwayzsidewayz's picture

I think that is the biggest challenge facing modern tech, one of battery life. The more functionality with any mobile device eats battery life, both my Tablet and andriod phone suffer with the more I ask of them. I miss the days on end my old nokia would last.

Its all very well intergrating nearly every aspect of modern life to a mobile, but if the batteries life is so short, how can it ever replace everyday items like keys and cash?

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16 May 2012 - 18:08
iande27543's picture

Mobiles will bring down the goverment and take over Xfactor! QR codes are a means to and end. Early technology, but I fear augmented reality and the public is also not going to be an easy sell in just yet.

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17 May 2012 - 10:45
benja46329's picture

Having been at the AdMonsters event I can tell you that timelines were put on most if not all of these predictions, generally in the 1-3 years category. The presentation also focussed on exponential growth which mobile is seeing. Having heard Russell speak before, this was another extremely interesting presentation, one that gets people thinking. As far as "godfather of mobile" etc, I doubt he gave himself this title!

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18 May 2012 - 12:48
fourcolourblack

What a utter load of toss. I remember reading about a 'bluetooth kettle' about 8 years ago that would turn itself on when you were approaching your front door. Assuming your phone doesn't have a little fit because a rain drop has hit the touch screen and turned itself off, the chances of it being able to open my front door just in time for the kettle to have paired with said phone were slim to none.

I can't wait for the first idiot to trust his house to be locked my his mobile only to discover he's been robbed by accidentally sending a tweet to his house by mistake.

I predict every single item on that list, except QR codes, will be here for the next 30 years.

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18 May 2012 - 14:44
antilimited

Masterful use of hyperbole in the headline… linking the gradual demise of what's (correctly) deemed an intermediate technology, with something even Buckley envisages may've gained common currency in 20+ years. Convergence is something for devices… not copywriters :)

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21 May 2012 - 08:34
pgord85084's picture

Everything's possible if the consumer is open to it... but how soon or how long is another question... NASA are working on body implanted communication devices which remove the need for carrying a GSM (phone) so even that could be dead in a few years... think about calling somebody and 'beep' you're through... you might even be able to do it by though alone without even having to speak... actually it's bollocks as I just made it up but given that it's plausible then I can safely predict that it could become gossip for nobody soon...

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