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P&J hopes it has finally dispelled the urban myth on its headline on sinking of the Titanic

Aberdeen-based regional daily, the Press and Journal, hopes that it has finally nailed the urban myth that its headline on the sinking of the Titanic read: ‘North-east man lost at sea’.

The DC Thomson-owned P&J hopes it has put the record straight in the final broadsheet edition of the newspaper before it switched to a new, compact form six-days-a-week.

Explained editor Damian Bates in a front-page news story ...”we can reveal, at last, that the P&J never reported ‘North-east man lost at sea’ in relation to the Titanic disaster.

“It’s an apocryphal yarn that sounds funny but, alas, isn’t true.”

The P&J reprinted the relevant inside news page of Tuesday, April 18, 1912 (as was the custom, the front page was fully taken out with advertisements) which reveals the actual heading was: ‘Mid-Atlantic Disaster’, with two sub-headings - ‘Titanic sunk by iceberg’ and ‘1683 lives lost; 675 saved’.

Bates adds: “As a regional newspaper, reporters did what they continue to do today; they sought to find a local link to what was the biggest international story of its day.

“And by day two –on April 17 – the P&J discovered a passenger from Boddam had been aboard the doomed vessel as well as an engineer from Torry among the Titanic’s crew-members.”

The P&J has switched to compact size in response to demand from readers for a more manageable size of newspaper.

Founded in 1747 as the Aberdeen Journal, and the world’s third-oldest English-language title, the P&J is now the UK’s top-selling regional morning daily newspaper with a circulation of around 71,000.

John Glenday

John Glenday is responsible for compiling The Drum's daily morning bulletin and ensuring that overnight breaking news is covered while you're still brushing your teeth. Can also make a mean cup of tea.

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